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The Women’s History Network Community History Prize

The Women’s History Network Community History Prize 2018 is live and calling for entries!

This annual prize of £500 is awarded to the team behind a Community History Project by, about, or for women in a particular locale or community which has been completed between the 1 January 2018 and 31st May 2019. It has been sponsored by The History Press since 2015.Last year’s prize was won by the wonderful entry from the Royal College of Nursing- please follow this link to see more about it: https://womenshistorynetwork.org/category/prizes/prizewinners

For details of this year’s competition go to https://womenshistorynetwork.org/whn-community-history-prize-sponsored-by-the-history-press

The Women’s History Network is a national association and charity for the promotion of women’s history and the encouragement of women and men interested in women’s history. Established in 1991, the network reaches out to welcome people from any background who share a passion for women’s history.We encourage submissions from projects which include a strong element of community engagement or collaboration and which communicate a sense of heritage uncovered and learning shared by participants from outside the academic or professional heritage sector.Projects can have creative or wellbeing outcomes, as well as research outputs, but the entrants’ activity must have led to the creation of something which is based on and communicates the findings of the group’s historical research, such as a production, artwork, website, documentary, pamphlet, heritage trail, book, exhibition, artefact or event.

With all good wishes, Elspeth King
Chair, Community History Prize.

Cave City

It’s back for 2019 and will run from 5 to 10 April 2019, a celebration of all things cave with chances to see some spaces under the city you have never seen before as well as to try some events and activities you wouldn’t usually see in a cave.


Urban Rooms Hub Saturday 6 April (12-4pm) Sunday 7 – Tuesday 9 April 2019 (10am-4pm) Urban Room, Carrington Street
Come along to the Caves Festival Hub to get all the info on events taking place across the city. Stunning cave photography by local photographer Lamar Francois will be on display (example below), and there will even be a chance to enjoy a virtual reality tour of the Nottingham Castle Caves (there may be a wait for this). This will also be a great opportunity to meet the team at Trent & Peak Archaeology who will be on hand at points over the Festival to talk about their work

Tour of Rock Cemetery Catacombs Friday 5 to Tuesday 9 April 2019 | 11am & 1pm £10 including booking fee
Brand new for this year is this unique opportunity to visit the fascinating catacombs beneath Rock Cemetery. Church Cemetery is bounded by Mansfield Road, Forest Road and The Forest Recreation Ground. Known as Rock Cemetery because of the sandstone caves within, these caves comprise intriguing tunnels. Visitors can see these while hearing tales of their past and legend. This will include the story of Robin Hood’s Cave, located on the eastern perimeter. In the mid-19th century, it was rumoured this area had been part of an ancient druid temple. Guided tours will provide an introduction and background to the Cemetery itself followed by a tour of the catacombs. The meeting point for tours will be at the main entrance to the Cemetery adjacent to the Cemetery Lodge, junction of Forest Road East and Mansfield Road. The tours are not suitable for wheelchairs or prams/buggies, and sensible footwear must be worn.
Those aged under 16 must be accompanied by an adult.

Mortimer’s Hole Cave Tours Saturday 6 – Tuesday 9 April 2019 | 10am, 11am, 12 noon, 2pm, 3pm Tickets: £5 including booking fee
Beneath Nottingham Castle, a labyrinth of man-made caves and tunnels continue to tell the turbulent story of this historic site. Enjoy a memorable tour discovering the secret passageway named Mortimer’s Hole, and hear tales from the site’s 1000 years of history. This is a unique opportunity to access some of the caves under Nottingham Castle, while it is closed for re-development. Please be aware that the tour is strenuous with LOTS of steep steps. Access to Mortimer’s Hole will be from Brewhouse Yard grounds only. The ascent up the tunnel to the top of Castle Rock is very strenuous and visitors will have to be physically fit to participate. Sensible footwear must also be worn.
N.B. For visitors who are unable to participate in this tour a Virtual Reality experience of Mortimer’s Hole is available throughout the Caves Festival at the Urban Room, 38 Carrington Street.

For more information see https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/UKNCC/bulletins/2359db5

Papplewick Pumping Station Exhibition: A Temple to Water at Beeston Library

Saturday 8th June to Saturday 13th July 2019, all day at Beeston Library

Inspire Arts and Heritage are pleased to work in collaboration with Dragon Breath Theatre, Nottingham University and Papplewick Pumping Station to bring an exciting heritage exhibition to Mansfield Central Library Gallery. Papplewick Pumping Station is as a treasure of Nottinghamshire Heritage and their work with Dragon Breath Theatre has created, an exciting education resource offering a fascinating and unique opportunity to become immersed in the past and as a result to develop your understanding of contemporary global water issues. The exhibition brings history to life with film, archive images of the pumping station and Carol Adlam’s wonderful illustrations for Nottingham University.

No booking necessary

Simply turn up and take part. We look forward to seeing you!

www.papplewickpumpingstation.org.uk

www.getwet.org.uk/

Home Cooked Heritage Exhibition at Worksop Library

Wednesday 5th June to Thursday 18th July 2019, all day, at Worksop Library. FREE. Simply turn up and take part. We look forward to seeing you!

How do you bring archive materials, 120 school children, 50 adults, a story teller, an artist and an archaeologist together in one project? FOOD! Exploring the heritage of recipes unearthed in Nottinghamshire Archives, a celebration of food stories, past and present have become a sea of tea towels showcasing creative responses to this HLF Shared Heritage project.

Home Cooked Heritage is Heritage Lottery Funded programme that has seen children and adults creatively explore the theme. The exhibition of archive materials and contemporary responses is touring library galleries and will then be added back into Nottinghamshire Archives for future food historians to uncover.

Nottinghamshire Archives is a fabulous resource open to the public and holding over 4 million documents waiting to be discovered.

We have been delighted to work with James Wright FSA, Clare Taylor and Nicky Rafferty on this Heritage lottery project alongside Bilsthorpe Flying High Academy and Greenwood Primary and Nursery School.

James Wright FSA, an archaeologist currently studying for a doctorate at the University of Nottingham. With over twenty years of experience, he has published two books and a string of popular and academic articles. James teaches and makes regular appearances for the BBC talking about history, archaeology and folklore. He also acted as a consultant for Channel 4‘s Time Team.

James worked with the Archivists, using the heritage documents, to bring the history of food prepared in both humble and privileged settings to life. He brought understanding of the ways that the form of buildings influences and is influenced by function, and how this changes over time, to the project. This knowledge underpinned the stories of how places as varied as grand stately kitchens, castles, wartime homes, and school canteens have produced the incredibly varied range of edible creations specific to their time and place.

Nicky Rafferty trained as an actor and has worked as a performance storyteller for over 20 years. Her work includes family story walks and storytelling workshops and events for clients including The National Trust & Nottingham Contemporary. Nicky brought the stories and characters found in the archives to life helping our participants see their place in the history uncovered and in their own food stories of today.

Clare Taylor a freelance artist educator, known as Curious Clare – Bus and Bird Arts, champions learning and creativity within communities by providing tailor made creative experiences for a broad spectrum of learners. An experienced community co-ordinator, Clare has designed & delivered bespoke creative learning sessions for a broad spectrum of learners. Clare has lots of experience of working with heritage and used this experience and her creativity to get the best from our participants.

Home Cooked Heritage Exhibition at West Bridgford Library

12 April – 30 May 2019, all day, at West Bridgford Library. Simply turn up and take part. We look forward to seeing you!

How do you bring archive materials, 120 school children, 50 adults, a story teller, an artist and an archaeologist together in one project? FOOD! Exploring the heritage of recipes unearthed in Nottinghamshire Archives, a celebration of food stories, past and present have become a sea of tea towels showcasing creative responses to this HLF Shared Heritage project.

Home Cooked Heritage is Heritage Lottery Funded programme that has seen children and adults creatively explore the theme. The exhibition of archive materials and contemporary responses is touring library galleries and will then be added back into Nottinghamshire Archives for future food historians to uncover.

Nottinghamshire Archives is a fabulous resource open to the public and holding over 4 million documents waiting to be discovered.

We have been delighted to work with James Wright FSA, Clare Taylor and Nicky Rafferty on this Heritage lottery project alongside Bilsthorpe Flying High Academy and Greenwood Primary and Nursery School.

James Wright FSA, an archaeologist currently studying for a doctorate at the University of Nottingham. With over twenty years of experience, he has published two books and a string of popular and academic articles. James teaches and makes regular appearances for the BBC talking about history, archaeology and folklore. He also acted as a consultant for Channel 4‘s Time Team.

James worked with the Archivists, using the heritage documents, to bring the history of food prepared in both humble and privileged settings to life. He brought understanding of the ways that the form of buildings influences and is influenced by function, and how this changes over time, to the project. This knowledge underpinned the stories of how places as varied as grand stately kitchens, castles, wartime homes, and school canteens have produced the incredibly varied range of edible creations specific to their time and place.

Nicky Rafferty trained as an actor and has worked as a performance storyteller for over 20 years. Her work includes family story walks and storytelling workshops and events for clients including The National Trust & Nottingham Contemporary. Nicky brought the stories and characters found in the archives to life helping our participants see their place in the history uncovered and in their own food stories of today.

Clare Taylor a freelance artist educator, known as Curious Clare – Bus and Bird Arts, champions learning and creativity within communities by providing tailor made creative experiences for a broad spectrum of learners. An experienced community co-ordinator, Clare has designed & delivered bespoke creative learning sessions for a broad spectrum of learners. Clare has lots of experience of working with heritage and used this experience and her creativity to get the best from our participants.

Papplewick Pumping Station, A Temple to Water Exhibition at Mansfield Central Library

20 February to 20 April 2019, all day at Mansfield Library

Inspire Arts and Heritage are pleased to work in collaboration with Dragon Breath Theatre, Nottingham University and Papplewick Pumping Station to bring an exciting heritage exhibition to Mansfield Central Library Gallery. Papplewick Pumping Station is as a treasure of Nottinghamshire Heritage and their work with Dragon Breath Theatre has created, an exciting education resource offering a fascinating and unique opportunity to become immersed in the past and as a result to develop your understanding of contemporary global water issues. The exhibition brings history to life with film, archive images of the pumping station and Carol Adlam’s wonderful illustrations for Nottingham University.

No booking necessary

Simply turn up and take part. We look forward to seeing you!

www.papplewickpumpingstation.org.uk

www.getwet.org.uk/

Dealing with the Past: Coal, Community and Change (1965-2015)

The travelling exhibition ‘Dealing with the Past: Coal, Community and Change (1965-2015)’ is currently on at Mansfield Museum until 30th March 2019.  The coal industry, once a main employer in the East Midlands, has a long and proud association with the arts and this travelling exhibition aims to deal with the contested memories of coalmining in the region through a selection of iconic photographs

Funded by the Global Heritage Research Fund at Nottingham Trent University, it aims to cover different important aspects of coal mining in the region during a time of rapid change. These include coal communities, the role of women in coal mining, the impact of closures and rationalisation, strikes and industrial action and legacies of the industry in today’s society.

The exhibition is free to attend with the Museum being open Mondays to Saturdays from 10am to 5pm. Please feel free to leave your comments on the post cards and/or post its, the aim is to try and gather public opinion on the role of East Midlands coalmining during the fifty-year period 1965-2015 and what legacies it has left for future generations. 

After Mansfield, the Exhibition moves to Chesterfield Museum during April 2019. Later venues include Harworth Town Hall (North Notts), the National Coalmining Museum for England and Conkers Discovery Centre. 

Best Wishes

David Amos

Research Associate in Coal and Dialect

Nottingham Trent University

Mobile: (07914) 373745

Websites:www.miningheritage.co.uk

Twitter: https://twitter.com/MuBuMiner

Current Archaeology in the East Midlands

Recent excavations by Trent and Peak Archaeology

Saturday 6 April – Sunday 30 June
Open Tuesday-Saturday, 11am-5pm; Sunday 12noon-4pm; closed on Mondays.

University of Nottingham Museum

Admission free

A new Museum Exhibition Programme, Current Archaeology in the East Midlands, displays and examines work undertaken throughout the East Midlands by archaeologists, community groups and museums.

This small exhibition examines some of the recent archaeological work undertaken by Trent and Peak Archaeology. Covering a broad period of time from the prehistoric to Victorian period it looks at the excavations and related finds and discusses the new information it is providing about the East Midlands.

This exhibition is in collaboration with Trent and Peak Archaeology.

Justin Time

Group Visit Information

Museum of Timekeeping

Group visits are a brilliant way to view our award winning Museum of Timekeeping which houses the most comprehensive collection of clocks, watches, and other timepieces outside London.

What to expect:

Private Tours typically last around two hours and feature an introduction about the history of the British Horological Institute, the museum and collection, followed by a guided tour of a selection of artefacts and displays from our ground floor museum galleries and the stories behind them, with time for questions at the end.

You will hear the original speaking clock, see the watch taken to the Antarctic by Captain Scott and be enthralled by the story of John Harrison, saviour of thousands of lives by his invention of the chronometer.

Group size:

A group size of around 15-24 people is ideal.  For groups of over 24 we just ask that you let us know in advance so that we can make arrangements for an additional guide.

Tickets:

Admission is charged at £10 per person, with a minimum charge of £100 applying during normal office hours i.e. Mon-Fri 9am-5pm although we can arrange visits at other times.

Availability and bookings:

For further information or to check available group visit dates please call 01636 817 601 or email info@museumoftimekeeping.org.uk

the booking period, so an approximate number is absolutely fine in advance, to be confirmed no less than two weeks before the tour date.

Access:

Upton Hall offers ample free parking and disabled access with the tour area situated on one level.

Refreshments:

There is a café on site and by prior arrangement it is also possible for groups to enjoy a buffet lunch in our Ballroom as an extension to your visit,

We very much look forward to welcoming you.

Upton Hall, Upton, Newark, Nottinghamshire, NG23 5TE

T: 01636 817601

justin.time@museumoftimekeeping.org.uk

Exhibition celebrating 200 years of the Mansfield & Pinxton Railway

At the Mansfield Museum, Leeming Street, Mansfield Sat 2nd Feb to Sat 2nd Mar 2019

The Kirkby and District Archaeological Group has joined with the Old Mansfield Society, Sutton Heritage Society, Pinxton and South Normanton History Society and railway historians to celebrate this wonderful piece of our heritage. Thanks to a Heritage Lottery Fund grant we are celebrating with exhibitions, talks, walks, book, leaflets, website, archaeology, teaching materials, activities and heritage boards along the route.

A Few Facts

  • The Mansfield and Pinxton Railway opened 13thApril 1819
  • The route went 7½ miles from Mansfield Wharf, over the viaduct at Kings Mill, past Kirkby Hardwick, over the Summit, through Kirkby, Portland Park and New Selston before arriving at the Pinxton Wharf 
  • The railway brought coal into Mansfield, and exported sand, stone and malt, amongst other items, via the Cromford Canal link at Pinxton Wharf
  • The opening celebrations included a marching band, a bonfire in Mansfield Market Square, the ringing of church bells, a procession, and feasting!
  • The wagons were pulled by horses, not engines, until the Midland Railway took it over in 1849
  • The rails were laid on stone blocks, not wooden sleepers and were “fish-bellied” in shape
  • A passenger carriage was added in 1832 to take people from Pinxton to Mansfield Market on Thursdays
  • The line has been in continuous use since 1819, now with the Robin Hood Line closely following the Kirkby to Mansfield section, this makes it the oldest continuously operating railway line in England – and a cause for celebration!

For further information please email denishill1066@gmail.com